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What are the requirements for a CDL in North Carolina?


North Carolina motorists may be aware that they are often positioned near semi-trucks on the roadway. Though many of these truckers are safe drivers, sometimes they are not. Those negligent truckers can make a tragic error that leaves an innocent motorist seriously injured. In an attempt to prevent bad truckers from entering the field and thus protect other motorists, the state requires them to obtain a Commercial Drivers' License, commonly referred to as a CDL.

There are many steps that must be taken before a trucker can receive a CDL. In addition to providing documentation regarding age and residency, CDL applicants must also show proof of a clean driving record. Prospective truckers must clearly show that their license is not currently suspended or revoked and that they do not possess multiple drivers' licenses.

CDL applicants must also take several tests. Though they must pass a written test, these individuals must also pass a skills test that not only assesses their ability to drive a commercial vehicle, but also their ability to inspect it for potentially hazardous conditions. Once a CDL is successfully obtained, drivers must also comply with other trucking regulations aimed at protecting the public.

Though the requirements that must be met in order to obtain a CDL are helpful in keeping bad truckers off the road, they are not fail-proof. Instead, truckers continue to cause devastating accidents that leave individuals with serious, sometimes fatal, injuries. Therefore, in some instances taking legal action is the best way to shine a light on this problem. Those who have been hurt in a truck accident may be able to file a lawsuit, impose liability, and recover compensation for their harm. However, each case is unique, so it might be wise to speak with a legal professional about a certain instance.

Source: North Carolina Division of Motor Vehicles, "Commercial Drivers (CDL)," accessed on Jan. 23, 2014

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