COVID-19 UPDATE: Christina Rivenbark & Associates is open and we are committed to meeting your legal needs. We can meet with you by phone or video conferencing. Please call our firm today to discuss your options.

We can help you through this
attorney-image

COVID-19 UPDATE: Christina Rivenbark & Associates is open and we are committed to meeting your legal needs. We can meet with you by phone or video conferencing. Please call our firm today to discuss your options.

attorney-image
We can help you through this

For more than 25 years, our respected attorneys have provided high-quality legal advice and representation to clients throughout Southeastern North Carolina.

Click To Call
910-338-9813

  1. Home
  2.  » 
  3. family law
  4.  » Is nesting a good choice for us?

The most common variety of custody agreement after a divorce is co-parenting. In a co-parenting situation, both parents share legal and physical custody of children, generally in a 50/50 split. 

This usually means moving the children between two separate households. However, in some situations this is not always the best scenario. This is why more families are starting to select a nesting-based parenting plan. Psychology Today states that nesting is when children stay in one domicile and the parents rotate in and out. 

Who does this work for? 

Nesting is most commonly a temporary arrangement. It is a good choice when you and your soon-to-be ex-spouse have decided to try separating but do not wish to disrupt your children’s lives. Nesting allows the parents to separate while keeping the children in a consistent environment. 

Nesting is also favored by parents who live in high cost of living areas. It is possible that after a divorce, neither parent would be able to support a single household in the same neighborhood. Nesting allows the parents to maintain a household in an expensive neighborhood so the kids can stay in the same school district with the same friends. 

Where do the parents live? 

This depends on the individual nesting arrangement. In some cases, the parents live with friends or family when they are not on duty. In other cases, the parents maintain a separate apartment to live in when not with the kids. 

Again, usually nesting is a temporary arrangement. At some point, the parents normally wish to establish their own households. However, nesting is a great way to keep your kids in a steady environment when you are going through divorce.