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COVID-19 UPDATE: Christina Rivenbark & Associates is open and we are committed to meeting your legal needs. We can meet with you by phone or video conferencing. Please call our firm today to discuss your options.

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  4.  » Looking into the consequences of back child support

Those who end their marriage may run into a number of hurdles during and after the divorce process. Aside from strong emotions and legal issues involving their kids, such as custody, the financial impact of a divorce can also affect people years later. For example, child support payments can create challenges for custodial and non-custodial parents alike, and it is pivotal for parents to handle these difficulties appropriately. In this post, we will look over some of the consequences that parents may face when they fall behind on their child support.

For starters, unpaid child support can create anxiety for both parents and kids as well. A non-custodial parent who misses payments may have his or her tax refund intercepted or wages garnished, or they could even be taken into custody. Moreover, irreparable damage to one’s reputation is another concern and people who owe enough back child support are not even able to obtain a passport in the U.S., which could interrupt their travel plans if they wanted to leave the country for business or to take a vacation.

Missing child support payments can create a myriad of problems, which underlines how vital it is for non-custodial parents to stay current. There may be some options on the table for those who cannot afford to pay child support. For example, modifying a child support order is one way that some people have been able to lower their payments and stay caught up. However, significant changes (such as the loss of a job) are necessary.